Pinterest: Reflection and Implications

Pinterest is a platform that serves for us; the masses, to both receive and internalize, as well as reflect back messages and certain ideas about idealism and an unattainable, yet seemingly perfectly within grasp perfection. To begin, Pinterest is largely aimed at women, in particular telling the public how women should look and how they can be the best domestics that they are capable of. Pins provide “easy” and “simple” ways that you can do different things, from create healthy alternatives, to style your hair in a runway ready look in just a matter of three steps, to speeding up your metabolism, and even how you can turn a shipping pallet into a fun and functionally chic couch. These seemingly simple how to projects provide the user with two very important things: a step closer to a supposed reachable perfection, and thus a step closer to overall happiness. “…The happiness it [pinning] promises often intersects with women’s work as homemakers and mothers.”

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I believe that the readings, in particular the Wilson & Yochim piece, really spoke to, and furthermore elaborated greatly on my already existing ideas and feelings towards Pinterest. Although I myself indulge in pinning from time to time, often using the site to look for popular recipes, shoes and helpful tips, I have noticed just how limited and one sided the view of Pinterest is. As mentioned earlier, this is a site that is largely aimed at women, even more specifically, this is a site that is aimed at the so called average American woman, who is white, Christian, educated, middle class, heterosexual, and is fit. She is a crafty woman, who although financially comfortable, is still frugal and always put together.

Although Pinterest seems to be a great way to compartmentalize and organize a collection of random information, I do believe that there is something much more vicious lying just beneath he surface layer of structure. This site works to perpetuate ideas and social standards of gender roles, and body image, which is exceptionally important to realize when considering the messages and effects thrust upon the younger generation of females.

Woks Cited

Wilson, Julie A. Yochim, Emily C. Pinning Happiness: Affect, Social Media, and Women’s Work. 2013.  Print.

My Pinterest

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